Question: What Are Aristotle’S 11 Virtues?

What is the aim of human life according to Aristotle?

Aristotle’s best life for humans.

According to Aristotle, the goal of a happy life is action itself, aiming to reach Eudaimonia.

For Aristotle, Eudaimonia represents the ultimate goal.

Every activity is performed for a certain target, which is rated individually as good and makes the best life to an active approach..

What are the main points of Aristotle’s ethics?

In order for one to be virtuous they must display prudence, temperance, courage, and justice; moreover, they have to display all four of them and not just one or two to be virtuous.

Why Is happiness the ultimate goal Aristotle?

The achievement of happiness, according to Aristotle, is the end goal of every man. His reasoning is thus: All human activities are done in order to attain something that is good. … We aim at happiness for its own sake, not because it will achieve something else. Happiness, therefore, is our greatest mission.

What are the 12 virtues?

Aristotle’s 12 virtues: Courage – bravery. Temperance – moderation. Liberality – spending. Magnificence – charisma, style. Magnanimity – generosity. Ambition – pride. Patience – temper, calm. Friendliness – social IQ.More items…•

What is a good life according to Aristotle?

Aristotle argues that what separates human beings from the other animals is the human reason. So the good life is one in which a person cultivates and exercises their rational faculties by, for instance, engaging in scientific inquiry, philosophical discussion, artistic creation, or legislation.

What are the 11 Nicomachean Ethics?

In Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle discusses eleven virtues: courage, temperance, generosity, magnificence, magnanimity, right ambition, good temper, friendliness, truthfulness, wit, and justice.

What is Aristotle’s idea of happiness?

According to Aristotle, happiness consists in achieving, through the course of a whole lifetime, all the goods — health, wealth, knowledge, friends, etc. — that lead to the perfection of human nature and to the enrichment of human life.

What is Aristotle’s moral theory?

Aristotle. The moral theory of Aristotle, like that of Plato, focuses on virtue, recommending the virtuous way of life by its relation to happiness. … Aristotle opens the first book of the Nicomachean Ethics by positing some one supreme good as the aim of human actions, investigations, and crafts (1094a).

What are Aristotle’s virtues in Nicomachean Ethics?

Aristotle gives a rough general taxonomy of the moral virtues, dividing them into those concerned with feelings or passions (courage and temperance), those concerned with external goods (e.g., generosity, magnificence, magnanimity), and those concerned with social life (e.g., mildness, truthfulness, wittiness, …

What is the highest form of happiness according to Aristotle?

Aristotle concludes the Ethics with a discussion of the highest form of happiness: a life of intellectual contemplation. Since reason is what separates humanity from animals, its exercise leads man to the highest virtue.

What are the 4 levels of happiness?

Aristotle distinguished between four different levels of happiness.Happiness level 1: Laetus. Happiness from material objects. … Happiness level 2: Felix. Ego gratification. … Happiness level 3: Beatitudo. The happiness from doing good for others and making the world a better place. … Happiness level 4: Sublime Beatitudo.

What is Aristotle’s Golden Mean?

Moral behavior is the mean between two extremes – at one end is excess, at the other deficiency. Find a moderate position between those two extremes, and you will be acting morally.

What is Aristotle’s theory of virtue?

Most virtue ethics theories take their inspiration from Aristotle who declared that a virtuous person is someone who has ideal character traits. … These traits derive from natural internal tendencies, but need to be nurtured; however, once established, they will become stable.

What are the 3 types of ethics?

The three schools are virtue ethics, consequentialist ethics, and deontological or duty-based ethics.